Incandescent Bulbs Phase-out Continues in 2014

Posted on March 24, 2014
In keeping with a law passed by Congress in 2007, tungsten-filament 40- and 60-watt incandescent light bulbs can no longer be manufactured in the U.S. as of January 1, 2014. This follows the already completed phase-out of manufacturing of 100-watt bulbs in 2012 followed by 75-watt bulbs in 2013. This final phase-out will be the most significant because 40- and 60-watt bulbs represent more than 50 percent of the consumer lighting market. The production of incandescent bulbs is being discontinued... Read more

It’s Lights Out for Incandescent Bulbs in 2014

Posted on January 16, 2014
Starting January 1, 2014, companies can no longer import or make 40-watt and 60-watt incandescent light bulbs. This marks the final phase of a national phaseout that started in 2012. Ironically, Thomas Edison's first public demonstration of the incandescent light bulb happened 134 years ago. But Edison would probably approve given the energy-saving properties of the two types of light bulbs that are the main replacements for incandescent bulbs—LED (light-emitting diode) and CFL (compact... Read more

Our Use of Power Is Slowing Down

Posted on June 26, 2012
Ever since Edison invented the light bulb, Americans use of electric power has trended upward. And with American homes increasingly plugging in technology that requires power—cell phones, iPads, DVRs, to name a few—you would think the opposite would be true. But according to experts, over the next decade, residential power use is expected to fall. According to the Electric Power Research Institute, from 1980 to 2000, residential power demand grew by about 2.5% a year. From 2000 to 2010,... Read more

Lighting Changes in Store for Americans

Posted on January 6, 2012
Lighting technology in the U.S. is changing dramatically. In fact, there will be more changes in the world of electric lighting in the next few years than there were in the past 100 years.  The current incandescent light bulb invented by Thomas Edison is notoriously inefficient. It wastes 90% of its energy as heat rather than light, which is why it is so hot when in use. In 2007, Congress passed the bipartisan Energy Independence and Security Act, requiring light bulbs to use at least 25%... Read more