USA, Not China, is #1 in Wind Energy

Posted on January 16, 2015
You may have heard that China leads the world in terms of megawatts (MW) of wind turbines installed. But a better measure of wind energy production is actually the total amount of electricity, measured in kilowatt-hours (kWh), that a country produces from wind and delivers to customers. And in this regard, it is the United States that leads the world in the amount of wind energy that powers its grid. Capacity (MW) measures wind turbine production and installation, but it is the electrical... Read more

Wind Energy Picks Up Speed in Michigan

Posted on November 23, 2014
Wind energy has been the primary source of new renewable energy in the state, according to the Michigan Public Service Commission. One reason is that wind power is about half as expensive to produce as utility companies initially expected, as little as $50 a megawatt hour in 2013 compared to more than $100 per megawatt hour in 2009. Currently, more than 20 wind farms are in operation or development in Michigan. Michigan’s growing wind business has meant falling prices for residential... Read more

Michigan Wind Energy Update

Posted on October 9, 2014
Michigan's installed wind energy capacity has boomed in recent years, and Michigan was recently named the 16th-ranked state with more than 1,000 megawatts (MW) of installed wind capacity (1,163 Mw installed). Michigan added the 8th most new capacity additions (MW) in 2012 and was the 6th fastest growing state by percentage. In 2013, 2.4 percent of the state’s electricity was being provided by wind. The state has more than 680 wind turbines and ranks 15th for the number of utility-scale wind... Read more

Wind Energy Production Rising in Michigan

Posted on August 16, 2014
Wind energy has been the primary source of new renewable energy in Michigan in the past few years. It could get even more of a boost as the Obama administration seeks a 30 percent reduction in carbon dioxide emissions by 2030. Wind energy is turning out to be about half as expensive to produce as utility companies initially expected—down to as little as $50 a megawatt hour from more than $100 a megawatt hour in 2009, according to the Michigan Public Service Commission. Wind power production... Read more

Wind Power Expected to See Unprecedented Growth in 2014

Posted on April 23, 2014
The American wind energy industry started construction on an historic and unprecedented number of new wind farms this year. Key factors spurring growth include an extension of the Production Tax Credit (PTC) and a record number of Power Purchase Agreements with electric utilities. Among other things, the PTC provides up-front tax relief of 2.3 cents per kilowatt-hour for the first 10 years of a project. At the same time, investments in technological advancements have driven down the cost of... Read more

Some Facts About the U.S. Electrical Grid

Posted on April 9, 2014
The U.S. electric grid delivers electricity to more than 144 million end-use customers in the United States. Construction of the grid was started in the late 1880s and continues today. About 70 percent of the grid’s transmission lines and power transformers are now over 25 years old; the average age of power plants is over 30 years. As most of us know, the U.S. electric grid is highly vulnerable to severe weather, which is the leading cause of power outages in the United States. Between 2003... Read more

Michigan’s Utilities are Meeting Renewable Energy Goals

Posted on January 9, 2014
In 2008, Gov. Jennifer Granholm signed into law comprehensive energy reforms. In addition to removing barriers to investing in environmentally friendly, new baseload generation needed by the state, the new law established Michigan’s first Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS). The RPS requires 10 percent of the state’s electricity supply to come from renewable sources by 2015. Michigan’s utilities are expected to meet the 10 percent goal by 2015, at costs that have been cut in half since... Read more

Wind Energy

Posted on October 9, 2013
While wind energy currently accounts for about 4% of the U.S. power sector, its potential is immense. Experts suggest that wind power can easily supply more than 20% of U.S. and world electricity. This is good news given that coal produces less than 40% of our power yet is responsible for 70% of the power sector’s greenhouse gas emissions. Here are just a few reasons to consider wind power as a source for electricity: Wind is a free, native fuel—Unlike other forms of electrical... Read more